Take down and transport after the Feast

Take down and transport after the Feast
Lusaka, Zambia

Lusaka, Zambia


At 6:00 am we started working on takedown in dismantling the shelter where we met during the Feast of Tabernacles. The men spent three days putting it up and the takedown was to take a good part of the day. I helped out with taking nails out of the wall supports. Every nail I took out was saved…it will be straightened and used next year as the shelter is set up again. Nails are expensive. We rolled up the home-made bamboo mats there were used for flooring and for the walls. The crew moved quickly and aptly under the direction of Haben Moonga, a hard-working, competent farmer and builder. He has put in charge of building the three UCG church buildings in the Mumbwa area. A ride for the Copper Belt people was arranged by running out to the main highway and getting a bus to drive into the game park and picking up the 18 people heading to Northeast Zambia. The Copper Belt people assumed that we were going to give them a ride to Lusaka, but that was not the case. Kambani Banda is a great planner and had all the logistics thought through with getting equipment back first to Lusaka and then taking two loads of people of over 60 at a time on the truck for the three hour trip to the Mumbwa area from Paray’s Game Park. Kambani Banda is a man of great patience who was able to handle the misunderstanding and arrange adroitly for everyone and everything to be accommodated. We then loaded the rented chairs and other equipment on the LifeNets truck that I drove back to Lusaka. Some of the Lusaka people also were taken back. One was an older woman with her grandchild that climbed amidst the luggage. There were four people in the back of the truck. Actually, this truck is called a “van.” What to me is a van they call a small bus. In the cab of the truck with me was Apren Moomba and his wife Grace. Grace was going into town to be with her daughter-in-law and nine-month old grandson Derrick who has cancer in his eye and will be having it removed. Doctors suspect that Derrick’s other eye may cancer in it, too. Surgery will be Tuesday at a hospital in Lusaka. We dropped off Grace and her son Javelin on a crowded street in Lusaka and then we carried on to a drop off half the chairs at an elementary school and the other half at a Catholic church and school. Both places rented the chairs to us. Finally on to Kambani Banda’s home where we unloaded many bags and boxes along with a full bed. Time was moving on and we needed to get back to load up all the people and their belongings for the bumpy trip home. The process of loading the first 60 people on the “van” was arduous. Tents were folded, belongings packed away in sacks. When we return we learn that the father of three of the members and ex-husband of another died earlier that day. The day before The day before I baptized Mostly and his mother Emily who were a son and the ex-wife. The other children were Nice Shachoogo, wife of Jerrison and Often Chifwepa, wife of Winter. In the loading process of the van, all 60 people were sitting on back of the van baking in the sun, but no one complained. Instead, there was happy bantering and I was told that they were not going to suffer on the three hour ride to Mumbwa because the wind was going to air condition them. The group got on its way. Shirely Banda after a while took me and Bev to the compound were we would stay the next two days. It was a walled secured complex of an inn and guest houses run and used by the government for diplomats and foreigners. It was huge and Bev and I walked around the perimeter that we estimated to be about two miles long. Kambani didn’t come until about eight PM….he stayed out at the game park and hadn’t heard about Apren Moomba’s return. It was dark and it was decided that the remaining group would pitch their tents again and return the next day. Apren did not return until after 10:00 pm. Bevin Moomba and Joe Banda were to dinner with us. Bevin will be receiving a LifeNets Developing Nations Scholarship. We are quite impressed with him. He will be attending University in either Lusaka or Kitwe in the Copper Belt starting in January. There is one more young man in Mumbwa that LifeNets wants to help go to University. This is a big step forward in this area as no one has ever had a higher education from this area. We really love the people of Zambia. There is a beauty in their warmth that is perfected with Christian conversion Tomorrow we go out to Mumbwa to see the LifeNets projects: cattle, wells and the agriculture program.


Last Great Day

Last Great Day
Lusaka, Zambia

Lusaka, Zambia


Today is the Last Day of the Fall Festivals. I speak three times with two sermons and a blessing of the children sermonette. Evertything that is said is translated consecutively and it is a challenge to keep the tempo going. I find that short quick sentences are best keep the sermon moving along better. Early in the morning I heard a beautiful harmony from a group of young singers about 100 feet from where we stayed. It was the youth choir practicing for their special music in the morning. The harmony and rhythm were perfect. At 9:30 am we had two baptisms. One was Emily who is the mother of three children in the Church. The daughters are Often and Nice. The son’s name is Mostly. We had arranged with the owner of the game park to use the pool for baptism. He was OK with that. But, when all of us got to the pool for the baptism the caretaker and lady manager put up a fuss and told us all to go to the lake some distance away. About 30-40 members showed up for the baptism and it was so demeaning. Kambani Banda was visibly upset and so was I. So many things are so hard to arrange and I felt that these people simply detested our people. I walked over to older lady and simply told her that we were going to go ahead with the baptism in the pool as we were given permission and asked her to respect what we were doing. Just then the owner came along and all was OK; the lady just glared at me. Kambani Banda was too upset to give the opening prayer, so I did. The baptism went beautifully. Kambani Banda had fallen the day before in Family Day races and skinned and bruised himself and could not enter to pool so I did the baptisms which we both concluded with the laying on of hands. Off to services a few hundred meters away. I gave a sermon about the White Throne Judgment as part of the Day of The Lord and put together the chronology of prophetic events shadowed by the Fall Holy Days. Apren Moomba translated. After services a group of us would sit in a circle and have lunch. We found this a very enjoyable experience as it became relaxing with good conversation. Bev and I are about the only ones who eat with utensils, everyone eats with their hands. A bowl with water for washing hands comes around before and after the meal. The afternoon services was clouded by sadness that our visit in Africa was coming to a conclusion. We really love these people. In some ways we feel so far away and in other ways it’s like being with very close friends and family who share the same human experience, but under different circumstances with different means. I am struck by how little they have and how much they enjoy the Feast experience. Our daily attendance is a strong 160 with almost every chair filled in the meeting shelter. In the afternoon the adult choir sang. All the singing has been without accompaniment. After services Mr. and Mrs. Mfulla invited the people who were most responsible for setting up the Feast site for drinks and socializing. We gathered by Kambani Banda’s tent in a big circle with about 20 people and reminisced the Feast. There were many questions about the Church and what is happening at the Home Office and future plans. The last activity was the “DANCE” in the meeting hall. That was fun. Bev and I were asked to come out and dance sort of a line dance–the people loved it. Everyday has been an absolute adventure here in Zambia. Tomorrow is the day we need to load 130 people up in two loads on the LifeNets truck and take them back 100 miles to the west.


October 13, 2006

October 13, 2006
Lusaka, Zambia

Lusaka, Zambia


What I had not realized until today here at the game park where everyone is camping is just how much work was put in by the United Church of God members to prepare this location for the Feast site. The last two years the only economically viable location for the Feast here in Lusaka has been this game park. The cost is $200 a day for everyone. It is somewhat a broken-down place as the owner does not keep it up and makes most of his money from hunting and selling game meat. Our men came here weeks before to cut down the tall grass and build the building where we are holding services. I thought it was permanent structure, but it will be taken taken down after the Feast. There is quite a large sheet metal roof on top. There is no other place to meet that would not be five to six times the cost that would take as many children as we have. The owner here has a pool but will not allow the children to swim in it. This festival site could use an infusion of some serious financial help to bring it up to better standards. There are more than 150 people here and with the new people coming from the Worldwide Church of God, there will be quite a large group. This site is a step up from Mumbwa, however. People live in new tents which they really like instead of the quickly constructed grass huts. The hall has comfortable chairs that Kambani Banda was able to borrow from other churches that were all hauled here. All the church people from Mumbwa were brought on our LifeNets truck in two shifts with each load carrying over 60 people. They will be returning to Nalubanda and Kasumpa in Mumbwa on Sunday…I must get some photographs. For us it’s been easier not having to travel into the bush to keep the Feast. I gave a sermon today about learning to live with joy–rejoice at the Feast and carry the joy beyond the Feast. I was notified 10 seconds before the start of services that I also had the sermonette. I took the time to talk about our meeting the day before in Makopa with the people keeping the Feast there. I mentioned the name of the leader Wilson Nkhoma and the people here were well aware of and took all the new developments very positively. After services we passed out candy or as they say “sweets” for the children. It’s a simple thing, but is a special touch that makes the children happy. Then we passed out the mosquito nets. Christina Davis in Portland, Oregon raised over $5000 for mosquito nets in Malawi and Zambia. It will buy almost 3000 nets. We passed out 100 of them to our church members who received them with great appreciation. Then lunch. Chairs were rearranged in the meeting hall. We sat with Mr. and Mrs. Mufosa and Maxwell and Joyce Kasakabantu. Mr. Mufosa has somewhere between 30 and 50 children. We don’t fully understand the entire story. He is 80 years old and had their last baby four years ago. Lunch consisted of rice, nsima, steamed carrots and chicken. It was tasty and we enjoyed great fellowship with talk and laughter. It gives us great joy to be with these people in such a poor society and see them enjoy themselves so much. It’s FAMILY DAY!!! We are told it is to be great fun and indeed it is! Races of all kinds for all ages. Take a look at some of the photos. The grand finale was the Tug of Peace. I’ll let the photos tell the story of the race. Awards consisting of more sweets were presented at the end of the program After the races we walked through the game park and saw zebra, bush buck, guinea fowl, buffalo. Several of us stopped by at the bar to have a drink. We spoke with the crusty owner who is a second generation Zambian with roots from South Africa. He told us about a new copper mine that he opening in the Mumbwa area. Zambia is rich in copper and prices are up making mining viable. The Banda’s and us came back to our chalet to work on his computer which has a serious problem with the primary hard disk. As we come closer a few families greet us. One family tells us how much they have appreciated the gift of LifeNets cattle, the medicines and the farm loans. They have applied themselves and greatly improved their life. That’s all they came to talk about–just to express gratitude. The other family had come to have the wife and ten year old daughter be anointed. Medical care is so difficult to come by. Our prayers were extra strong and we will continue to pray for these large families that live so remotely under such harsh conditions. Bev and I have special admiration for them and want to continue helping them by not just giving them more, but helping them with the means to help them have a better life. It’s Friday night at the campground and an outside party comes to celebrate a birthday deluging us with loud music until way past 1:00 am. Our minds are filled with many impressions and thoughts. We ask God for guidance as to how to proceed further. Tomorrow I have give two sermons, the blessing of the children (of which there will be many) and a baptism at the pool at 9:30 am reluctantly agreed to by the owner.


Visiting interesting group in Mumbwa

Visiting interesting group in Mumbwa
Mumbwa Town, Zambia

Mumbwa Town, Zambia


We live in a little cottage. We are glad that we got the mosquito net not so much for the mosquitoes, but because of all the other creepie crawlies. We chased off the five inch spider, but he as back today! So, we’re just going to live with him. Bev has even befriended him calling him “Goliath.” He is just over the night stand and we have to be aware not to bump our head into him. Kambani Banda told us that he has never seen such a spider and that he “hopes it’s not poisonous.” We had not planned on this, but an interesting development has taken place in that the what remained of the Worldwide Church of God in Zambia. WCG members in Zambia were told that the church was going to Sunday worship and that the Festival Days, that we had been observing for years, were no longer to be kept. These church members were kept in the dark about where the church was really going all these years. Beacause of loyalty to the church, they hung on as long as they felt they could keep the Sabbath and Holy Days, but earlier in the year they were notified by their leaders that observing the God-ordained Sabbath and Holy Days was no longer to be done. The leader, Wilson Nkhoma and many of the brethren could no longer accept this and withdrew from the Worldwide Church of God. Just before the Feast of Tabernacles they notified the United Church of God that they wanted contact. Our Zambian pastor, Kambani Banda spoke to UCG’s president Clyde Kilough about this at the very recent Southern Africa ministerial conference and it was suggested that when Beverly and I came to Lusaka for the Feast that we would also go to the place where the remnant of WCG was keeping their Feast in Mapoka in the Mumbwa region. It was a two and a half hour drive to Mapoka. The last eight kilometers were very slow going over very rutted road and potholes that could swallow up an entire car. As in Lusaka where the brethren stood waiting and singing a greeting song, we were welcomed warmly by more than 100 people. After some introductions, we started the church service that went for more than two and a half hours. Wilson Nkhoma gave an introductory message about himself and the group that was most enlightening. He had been a member of the church since 1963. He had a rich experience in the church and a proper understanding of the Truth that God has granted us. He was kind and respectful. Next speaker was Kambani Banda who was to introduce me, but Mr. Banda went on to tell about himself and his history in the Church. Again, this was most enlightening and very tastefully delivered. I then spoke about United Church of God and how and why we started. Then I gave a sermon about understanding the Gospel of the Work of Jesus Christ through the Festivals and Holy Days. Afterward we had lunch. All the cooking was done outside. I was able to get better acquainted with Wilson Nkhoma and his wife Dorothy. I was very impressed by him, his maturity. He told me that in Zambia there will be probably about 200 people who will want to worship with the United Church of God. Realistically, it may be more like a hundred, but certainly it will add greatly to the 150 we already have. Kambani Banda is very pleased at this development. We then took a group photo, chatted some more and started on our way back to our Feast site in Lusaka. I drove both ways in Kambani Banda’s club cab pickup. Back at the game park/camp ground we were glad to see the boys playing soccer with ball we had brought with us. The evening ended with a variety show. It consisted of mostly hilarious skits. The most enjoyable aspect was seeing the people in meeting hall laughing uproariously and just plain having a good time. Another fascinating day end. I now focus of three more sermons I have to give in the next two days.


In Zambia!

In Zambia!
Lusaka, Zambia

Lusaka, Zambia


It was interesting stay overnight at the home of Mark Katsonga Phiri. He is quite a national leader. He has also been a long-time member of the Blantyre Chamber of CommerceHe was President of it for four years. Servants prepared a tasty breakfast for us before we packed up in the same vehicle we traveled in yesterday and Peter drove us to the Blantyre Airport. On to Lusaka! The flight first went to the capital Lilongwe and then the one hour 40 minute leg to Lusaka. Shirley and Kambani Banda were there to greet us. How good to see them again!! Kambani Banda has been an excellent minister in Zambia, an excellent manager and one who has made our LifeNets projects intending to change people’s lives for the better a phenomenal success. I have a great deal of trust in their capacity to make things happen…simply because they HAVE made things happen. Always, the strength of LifeNets has been our competent delivery at the beneficiary’s end. Other organizations such service clubs and churches have noted this about LifeNets. I tell them that we use our ministers and old-time acquaintances to deliver our programs. We are strict regarding accountability and if we make mistakes we correct them and determine not to make them again. We stopped at Manda Hill mall to change money. The Zambia Kwacha is 3850 to one US dollar. We got about two million Zambian Kwachas for $500. Bev was commenting to Kambani Banda who is a certified public accountant that you need an accounting degree in this country just to manage the money and exchange rates. We headed out to Feast site which is at Paray’s game park just outside of Lusaka. The entire church greeted us outside the camp ground with a wonderful welcome sign for Bev and me. They sang a few greeting songs. It was very touching to us. We settled into our chalet and prepared for the afternoon church service which didn’t start until almost 4:30 PM. Compared to keeping the Feast in the Mumbwa area in Zambia’s interior, this shelter was superior. There were nice chairs for everyone instead of wooden benches and actually no seating in year’s past. As in Malawi, we are becoming more familiar with the people and feel we know them so much better. I gave the sermon. The special music was exceptional! The choir sang beautifully, in harmony with no accompaniment in perfect rhythm. The voices were skillfully blended. The people look great! So much better than our first years. The dress, appearance, even the demeanor is a tribute to Kambani Banda’s management of livelihood development programs that are working beyond our expectations. Mr. Banda tells me that an indicator of improved conditions is the tripling and quadrupling of church tithes. Just as we were leaving the hall Mr. James Mphulah stopped by. He is deputy permanent secretary of the Ministry of Home Affairs here in Zambia and a member of the United Church of God. He is a man of great humility and competence. Under his administration is the Zambian police and control of the borders. Dinner was brought to our chalet. There are lots of bugs and Bev yelped at the five inch spider. Kambani Banda and Apren Momba got a mosquito net put up more for keeping out all the critters than the mosquitoes of which there are few. Another day of excitement comes to a close……tomorrow I’m sure there will be more!


Tuesday, October 10 — leaving Mangochi

Tuesday, October 10 — leaving Mangochi
Blantyre, Malawi

Blantyre, Malawi


This is our last day at the Feast here in Malawi and saddens grips me. We love the Malawian people, they truly have the warm heart of Africa as the travel advertisements go. Bev and I have gotten into the personal lives of so many of the Malawi brethren and feel satisfaction in being providers of hope not only spiritually, but vocationally as well. We have taken at least ten application for livelihood development projects to consider and to fund before the beginning of the year. Most projects to this point, both in scholarships and livelihood development have been successful. We try to tell them about the LifeNets mission of providing practical aid that makes people self-sustaining and then helps them help others. Bill Jahns and I both gave sermons, Bill about the Resurrection and I spoke about marriage. Since we enjoyed the children’s choir so much earlier, I made a special request for them to sing again. They did. Then the church choir sang as well. It was beautiful. After the service was complete, Beverly addressed everyone about LifeNets and gave some important pointers about our programs Then the lunch. Today we invited everyone over to the Nkopola Lodge for a lunch. All 140 people came and enjoyed a delicious lunch, provided by brethren in Boston, Houston South and Central Illinois. Time to go. Our driver is “Peter” from the Customs and Excise Office of Malawi. He works for my Rotarian friend Agnes Katsonga Phiri who is the head of that division. Rotarians help one another and this was a BIG help as the 100 mile distance from Lake Malawi to Blantyre is difficult to arrange. I cannot say enough about Rotary’s support for what we are doing to help people. We were taken to the home of Mark and Agnes Katsonga Phiri. Agnes has gone to visit her daughter in London, but the house is made available to us. Mark is a bit late coming from work. He is also a major poultry producer in Malawi. He had been President of the Chamber of Commerce. He has dinner with us served by home servants. A young orphan girl Loughan who is Agnes’s niece lives with them. She is a senior in high school. She is very friendly with us and we enjoy her presence. Mark Katsonga Phiri is a very competent person who is intimately acquainted with the politics and economics of Malawi. We do see him as the President of the country in the future. The six of us carried on an animated conversation until 10 pm. It was fascinating and enlightening.


Monday, October 9, 2006

Monday, October 9, 2006
Mangochi, Malawi

Mangochi, Malawi


Today I borrowed a bicycle from one of the staff at the hotel to go some exercise. It’s not just a bike ride, it’s an eyeful of local Malawi life. The area is predominantly Muslim. I pass mosque and mosque and madressa. The people are very peaceful and gentle Muslims and very friendly. The Catholic Church and the Muslims compete for the hearts of the people in this region. I biked about 20 miles and enjoyed seeing the sights of fields being worked up to be planted in anticipation of the rainy season. Women carried incredible loads on their heads of water, wood and everything else. Trucks hauled a dozen or more men in the back to who knows where. It was just plain interesting to see all this activity. Children continually wave in friendly innocence. When coming back to the Nkopola Lodge, I saw officers in military dress and a prominent-looking woman with a dress saying “Fight Corruption.” We found out from brethren that she was Speaker of the Parliament who is often seen on television. Mililtary personnel in full colors were also present. We found out later that they were there for funeral of a Malawian official who was from this area of the country. On to Church services. Bill Jahns gave a good sermon about the education and how that knowledge is powerful and how it benefits our lives. After services we took group photos of extended families. The Salawilla family was the biggest with almost 20. The Chimbuzo family was probably second. They had about 15 of their family at the Feast. Then the Mapinda’s. One thing I really enjoy at the Feast is watching the families relate to one another and work together. In the afternoon I had three people come by to talk about various matters. In the evening we had another barbeque. Henry Khembo along with his wife Cindy have really been servants and have given themselves so much to these people. He had bbq’d guinea fowl and chicken along with rice or nsima, the maize staple. In the United States the closest thing to nsima is grits. Afterwards we got together with Bill and Cheryl and had some good conversation. We are sad to have to leave this Festival site midway. We have really gotten to know the people well and would like more time with them, but Zambia calls. Tomorrow we go back to Blantyre and stay with Rotary friends and fly to Lusaka on Wednesday. Bill and Cheryl fly back to South Africa where they will continue the Festival in Uvongo on the Indian Ocean.


Sunday, October 8

Sunday, October 8
Mangochi, Malawi

Mangochi, Malawi


Today we broke another record in Malawi UCG history. Yesterday the attendance was 137. Today it grew to 141. The meeting hall is filled to capacity and the four air conditioners are working at full capacity, but it’s still hard to give a sermon with a suit coat on. I gave the morning sermon entitled “What God Has Begun, He Will Finish.” I feel that the people need encouragement to know that God knows what He’s doing in working in a poor country like Malawi. He has a special plan for everyone He calls. After services as a minister I spent time talking to people about personal matters and LifeNets projects and grants. Overall the people have done wonderfully in the livelihood development area as well as the scholarships that we introduced here only two years ago. Afterwards we took the three principle people in the Maize Mill Project out to lunch to talk about how things were going. We are pleased as to how the maize mill project is working. It is working with a commodity, so there will always be an income generated. Eliphazi Salawilla, Fred Chimbuso and Mr. Chikaza have formed a three-part association. Our aim is to make this maize mill a model of good business practice and customer service. We found that the the daily bus transportation for Fred Chimbuso and Mr. Chakaza were exhorbitant, but a problem that could be resolved if they could get to work by bicycle. We will get them bicycles and cost them $100 each. In the evening we had the variety/fun show which was really great. Kids recited poems, various people sang and jokes were told. It was so enjoyable to see people having a good time in this land of poverty and hopelessness. It gave me a great deal of satisfaction to see the values of the Church translate into such a wonderful display. Afterwards, we had the game feed, although when the game was being hunted earlier in the day, elephants unexpectedly showed up and drove them away from the hunters. So, goats were butchered instead and we had some guinea fowl. Bev and I walked home along the beach in utter darkness.


First Day of the Feast of Tabernacles

First Day of the Feast of Tabernacles
Mangochi, Malawi

Mangochi, Malawi


Today is the first day of the Feast of Tabernacles and we have two services scheduled. We had breakfast at the Nkopola Lodge with Bill and Cheryl Jahns. It’s quite windy on the lake, but absolutely beautiful. It’s about a quarter mile walk from where we stay to the meeting hall and you need to walk right along the lakeshore which is public access. It’s quite an experience seeing all the ladies and children doing their washing and laying the clothing out on the sandy beach. It’s amazing to see how nice the people do look dressed even with such primitive methods of washing and doing normal life chores. It was wonderful seeing everyone at the meeting hall before services. This is our third Feast of Tabernacles in Malawi in four years and we recognize most everyone and know many of the names. Because we work with so many people on livelihood and scholarship projects, we have become quite close to them and feel a bond of genuine friendship. Lewis Salawilla leads songs, elder Gladstone Chonde gives the sermonette and I gave the sermon that was translated into Chewa by Mr. Chierwa. All went well. The afternoon sermon was given by Bill Jahns. We talked a long time after the afternoon service before having dinner back at the lodge. We invited two families to join us. It was unbelievably enjoyable to have this time with them.


To the Festival site in Mangochi on the Lake

To the Festival site in Mangochi on the Lake
Mangochi, Malawi

Mangochi, Malawi


We leave for the Lake Malawi today. It’s been pleasant staying with the Chilopora’s at their home. We have visited here several times and always enjoy coming here. We feel very comfortable with them. This morning I was able to get Chiku’s computer fixed. We pack up and head to the lake. The Chilopora’s bring all their food with them. They also bring plenty for others. They are very generous people and God has blessed them for it. Because there is so much, Dr. Chilopora asks his nephew to drive some of the items to Mangochi in his pickup truck. It is Friday and as we drive the 100 mile distance we see faithful Muslims walking to their place of worship at the mosque. This area has been Muslim since the Middle Ages when the Arabs invaded this area. It became a primary area for slave trade for several centuries where the inhumane practice of forcing thousands of people into slavery from the villages. Local chiefs were guilty of selling their own people for profit to Arabs who shipped them all over the world, including the United States. We got to Mangochi mid-afternoon and settled in. We are very happy with our accommodations at the Nkopola Lodge. We have a nice round home. We are familiar the setup here and look forward to our stay. We met Bill and Cheryl Jahns who came up the day before and went to dinner with them. We are so blessed to be with these people and in this land. Our plans are to stay until Tuesday when have to get back to Blantyre and stay overnight. We have been invited to stay at the home of a Member of Parliament Mark Katsonga Phiri. As mentioned previously, his wife Agnes is the Assistant Rotary Governor for Malawi, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Mozambique and very kind and partial towards us. They will not think of us staying at any hotel and want us to stay with them. We are concerned about how we will get back from the Lake to Blantyre, because there are only four vehicles here at the Feast. Henry Khembo’s camper and our two ambulances and one more family with a car. Agnes has offered to drive us on occasion and I did help them quite a bit last summer when they stayed with us in Indianapolis. We called her and asked if she could send a driver from Blantyre to Mangochi to take us back to Blantyre She obliged and within an hour arranged for a “Peter” from her office at Excise and Customs to come and get the Jahns’ and us on Tuesday. Agnes herself flies to the United Kingdom tomorrow to see her daughter in London.