Memorial Day Post by Oleh Kubik about Dad

I would like to post this Memorial Day.

My Dad was 16 years old when the Nazis invaded Ukraine. Hitler outlawed high school attendance and offered many youths the "opportunity" to go to Germany and work and earn some money and return in 3 months. 3 YEARS later my Dad is gaunt famished and working as a slave in Nazi labor camps.

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Visit with John D. Cooke, former vice-president of McDonald’s Corporation

December 3, 1997

On Wednesday, December 3, 1997 Jim O’Brien, pastor of UCG Cincinnati North and Lexington, KY congregations and I visited with former McDonald’s vice-president and ombudsman, Mr. John D. Cooke. We were guests at his home in Galena, Illinois where he and his wife Marge have retired. Jim O’Brien has been a friend of Mr. Cooke for many years, going back to the time when they both lived in Paducah, Kentucky.

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My visit to where I was born in Germany

In 1985 I wanted to visit refugee camp Lyssenko in Hannover, Germany camp where my parents lived from 1945-1949.  I was born there in October 1947.  From other Ukrainian families who were from the same camp as my parents at camp Lyssenko I got the address and the exact location where my parents lived.  Camp Lyssenko was in the northern part of Hannover, north of the city center.

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Kubik’s come to America 1949

May 21, 2017

I have just recently come across a letter that my father Igor wrote on July 18, 1949 to his Minnesota sponsor in the United States. This was the day before he, my mother Nina and I left Germany for the United States. The letter is preserved in the family archives of University of Minnesota professor Dr. Alexander Granovsky. He was the sponsor for our family to leave refugee camp Lyssenko in Hannover and start a new life in the United States.  

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From a sermon I gave in Los Angeles in spring 1992….

In 1992 I was a guest speaker in the Los Angeles congregation. My friend with whom we traveled together from Pasadena took notes, but as his habit was, he took them in the form of spontaneously generated poetry. He really caught the essence of my message well in this poem.  I just found this among my sermon notes from years gone by and thought you might enjoy this.

Vic Looks at Passover