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  • A Malawi Wedding

    A Malawi Wedding
    Blantyre, Malawi

    Blantyre, Malawi


    We are all set for the wedding in which I’m to officiate from which go on to the airport. I hope that Mr. Chonde has the ceremony book and without a rehearsal I hope that nothing we do in our English weddings is taboo here, but we’ll see. We have appreciated the accommodations at the Baptist Missionary Apartments that amounted to $18 per night. We have tried to stay as economically as possible when traveling and in that way we have more money available to help the people we visit. We were to be picked up at 8:00 for the 8:30 am wedding. Meshech Chonde didn’t come with the ambulance until past 8:30, but things are flexible here and we have lots of time before we have to fly at 1:30 pm for Blantyre. In the meantime we had a wonderful conversation with two young ladies who were doing mission work with orphans. One was Monica from Michigan and the other was Elizabeth from Oahu, Hawaii. Both worked for an organization called Children of the Nations out of Seattle, Washington. They work with orphans and we learned of their work as they helped with feeding and lodging orphans in nearby villages. I was struck by their focus and desire to alleviate suffering. Also, I was impressed by how some organizations are organized and funded to help in this way. We arrived at the Malakia Clinic and at first there were just a few people waiting for the not only for the wedding party, by for the guests as well. I was wondering what this was ... Read more about this post

  • Sabbath in Lilongwe, Malawi

    Sabbath in Lilongwe, Malawi
    Lilongwe, Malawi

    Lilongwe, Malawi


    This morning we had a respite from the extra full days of travel and moving about. It is Sabbath morning and we rested well. I had a chance to do some studying for my sermon today plus do some journal writing. Services are scheduled for 11:00 but we were told that people from the country are sometimes an hour late and services can start as late as noon. It is about fifteen minutes from the Baptist Missionary apartments where we stay to the Malakia Clinic where we hold services. We agreed for our drivers in the ambulance to come and get us at 10:45 am. They were there, but the traffic back to Area 21 of Lilongwe where the clinic is located was fierce and in gridlock. It was almost completely stopped and we had to find an alternate route along a dusty road to get to services. We were a half hour late and most of the people were already in their seats waiting for the services to start. It as wonderful to see everyone again. We recognized most of the people. There were a few new people as well. We definitely have a bond after five trips to this area in six years. Also, from New York City were Henry and Cindy Khembo. Henry used to live in Malawi, but has married Cindy and now works in New York. He travels three to four times a year to Malawi and is an aggressive business person. Edwin Chonde was the song-leader and I accompanied him on the electric keyboard on the table next ... Read more about this post

  • Lilongwe!!

    Lilongwe!!
    Lilongwe, Malawi

    Lilongwe, Malawi


    On our international travels what I enjoy most is interacting with people of different cultures and races. As a minister of Jesus Christ, I find it nothing short of miraculous that the values or behaviors of Christianity are universal and were intended to work with all people, no matter how diverse they may be. I’m not sure why I even started my thoughts today with these words except to say that our mission wherever we travel is promote, preach a way of life that gives application to the maxim in the last paragraph. As we head for poor Malawi which is so different from my culture, background and citizenship, these thoughts flood my brain. I got up at 3:30 am. … we left at 6:15 am for Johannesburg airport, but before that I wanted to get another entry on my TravelPod blog which I did. Bill Jahns fortunately has DSL and wireless and it was easy to do. It may be a little while before more postings are made, but I’ll keep writing the blog and upload as I’m able. The traffic in the Johannesburg area is like any major city in the world. The Joburg area has over five million people in a society that has extreme wealth coexisting side by side with poverty. We were concerned that our luggage was far too much for the internal traffic within Africa. In fact, we were braced to pay upwards of $200 in additional overweight charges. I silently prayed that we wouldn’t have to. All that overage was in humanitarian items that we brought over. As we walked ... Read more about this post

  • With Bill and Cheryl Jahns in Johannesburg

    With Bill and Cheryl Jahns in Johannesburg
    Johannesburg, South Africa

    Johannesburg, South Africa


    We left Washington D.C. for the long flight over both the North Atlantic and South Atlantic oceans. Halfway across there was a fuel stop in Dakar, Senegal located on the west coast of Africa. After 17 hours of flying including the one hour stop, we landed at noon Thursday in Johannesburg, South Africa. Bill Jahns was waiting for us. How wonderful to see him! Bill and Cheryl are special friends in the ministry. Bill, Cheryl and I attended Ambasssador College in Pasadena together in 1966….we’ve been friends 40 years. We have gone through many experiences and adventures in the Church. Who would think that we would meeting in South Africa….and this is the third time in the past few years. Bill and Cheryl took an assignment in South Africa to serve here for five years starting in 2002. They will be returning to the United States to serve in a pastoral position. Morgen and Joleen Kriedemann who are native South Africa will replace Bill and Cheryl Jahns. Bill has done a valiant job here serving not only South Africa, but in Malawi and some in Zambia as well. The Church in Johannesburg has grown from 40 when the Jahns arrived to well over a 100 now. Because of our friendship and the Jahns’ love for the impoverished areas to the north of here, we have been able to get a lot done effectively with the people in both Malawi and Zambia through LifeNets. Morgen and Joleen came over for dinner Thursday evening and we had a great time talking ... Read more about this post

  • Dakar

    Dakar
    Dakar, Senegal

    Dakar, Senegal


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  • In Washington DC

    In Washington DC
    Washington DC, DistrictofColumbia

    Washington DC, DistrictofColumbia


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  • Finally underway!!

    Finally underway!!
    Washington DC, DistrictofColumbia

    Washington DC, DistrictofColumbia


    Our journey actually started TODAY! In doing a travel blog, I like to write days before leaving and talk about we’re going to be doing on our trip. But, there has been so much preparation and other tasks before leaving that I am just now starting to write. I write this from Dulles Airport in Washington DC between our flight from Indianapolis and almost a six hour layover to our South African Airways flight directly to Johannesburg. This is our sixth trip to Africa. Bev and I have had the opportunity of not only serving as a minister at the Feast of Tabernacles, but also with serving in a humanitarian way in some of the most impoverished countries in the world. According to the United Nations, Malawi is the third poorest country in the world with Zambia the fourth poorest. We have seen the growth of the churches in Malawi rise from one family in 1996 to more than 110 total in regular attendance. We met the first UCG members Gladstone and Alice Chonde of Lilongwe, Malawi in Mutare, Zimbabwe at the Feast of Tabernacles in 1996. They operated a basic “clinic” in Lilongwe. They worked with barely any supplies or equipment. I wrote about my talks with them on my website http://www.lifenets.org/malawi in 1996. I received a positive response from then Salt Lake City pastor Bill Jahns who offered to help send badly-needed medicine. I was then able to find a US Government Aid program that paid for shipping 40 foot twenty ton containers. We sent the first one in 1998. Much ... Read more about this post